Sigapy: a failed attempt to create a product in Paraguay

A little more than a year ago, I created a service which main intention was to provide my fellow Paraguayans living abroad, an easy way to call home using their smartphones. It was not like Viber or Tango app, you could actually call to land lines and mobile phones, and of course between Sigapy users.

There’s no specialized service like this in Paraguay, and I wanted to fill that void with something new and easy to use, and so Sigapy was born. It was conceived as an academical project but soon it started to appear exploitable as a commercial service, but the environment for this kind of business in Paraguay isn’t the best (actually, it’s horrible) and I had to shut it down for my own juridical sake.

Today, I decided someone else can give it a try, because it’s a more or less mature product and can easily be adapted to someone else’s needs.

Check out the videos and the landing page I created. The videos are in Spanish, but the flow can be understood by anyone.

NGS

NGS

UPDATE: with this project, I won a place in the 4th generation of startups of Wayra Mexico. More updates to come in the future posts :).

NGS, or Next Generation Support, is a project that I created to participate in the TADHack event. It is about improving the user experience we have when we call to customer support, and it takes advantage of the new telco technologies we have today, to create a product that tries to fix a rather common issue which is the bad quality in customer support systems.

What NGS has to offer?

  1. Everyone has a smartphone, and there’s an app for everything, why not for a specialized customer support?
  2. It’s really annoying to navigate through the IVR menus. It’s easier to directly go to the option you want, with a click.
  3. It can be completely free, the only thing you need is an Internet connection.
  4. The customer would be able to call from literally anywhere in the world, using Internet, no toll-free numbers at all.
  5. Call center agents can know exactly who’s calling, where is he located, and what does he want, and with this info a better customer experience can be offered.
  6. The customer can take advantage of the current technology, with HD voice quality, chatting, video calling, screen sharing, etc.
  7. The customer can know exactly who is behind the phone, with a picture, an email, a full name, and he can rate the experience he had with the agent.
  8. In summary, improved customer experience from every angle you can think of.

Opensource communication technologies I used

  1. Kamailio
  2. rptengine: this one belongs to the Kamailio project but deserves special mention because it powers the media relaying. Extremely important
  3. SIPjs
  4. Freeswitch
  5. CSipSimple: compiled in library mode, it allowed me to use PJLIB to create SIP apps for Android.

I posted below, a few screenshots of the software, and I’m planning to add more and release the code during this month.

This is a work in progress. The project has only 3 weeks of being alive, at the time this post was written.

Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-33-52 Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-34-00 Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-34-17 Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-34-21 Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-34-32 Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-34-39 Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-35-59 Screenshot_2014-06-05-20-36-15 Screenshot Screenshot-1

 

 

Csipsimple: a custom version

csipsimple-logo

Ever heard of it? It’s an Android SIP client, the best to my opinion, that ports the PJSIP stack to Android devices and adds to it a really good-looking user interface.

Four months ago, I started studying Android programming and the love for it didn’t take long to come. Learning it was relatively easy because of my background on Java, but it is a complicated platform with so much diversity that it will take long before I could say that I fully understand everything.

Creating a custom version of Csipsimple has been in my TO-DO list since more than a year. I first tried to rebrand it but I had no idea how to do it and I even downloaded the code and took a look on it. It was Chinese to my eyes.

Finally, I decided to study Android and the result of it is a work in progress which is looking quite good and promising to be a great product for ng-voice, the company I work for.

Below are a few screenshots of the product, and with this link you can get to the github project with a full list of features and things that makes the softphone different than the original csipsimple.

Login Screen

Login Screen

Customer information screen

Customer information screen

Dialer

Dialer